Quantized Confusion

Welcome to my well of infinite potential

red-lipstick:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center -  View of the Earth on September 21, 2005 with the full Antarctic region visible.

red-lipstick:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center -  View of the Earth on September 21, 2005 with the full Antarctic region visible.

(Source: svs.gsfc.nasa.gov, via zeroyalviking)

itsfullofstars:

a new look at the solar system

These are fun to make! I call it an animated postage stamp.
Mathematica Code:

Manipulate[ Plot3D[Sin[x y + \[Phi]] Cos[    x y + \[Phi]], {x, -\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {y, -\[Pi], \[Pi]},   Boxed -> False, Axes -> False, Mesh -> False,   ColorFunction -> ColorData[“CoffeeTones”],   Background -> Darker[Brown],   PlotRange -> {{-\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {-\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {-\[Pi], \[Pi]}},   ViewPoint -> {0, 0, 1}], {\[Phi], 0, 6 \[Pi], \[Pi]/8}]

These are fun to make! I call it an animated postage stamp.

Mathematica Code:

Manipulate[
 Plot3D[Sin[x y + \[Phi]] Cos[
    x y + \[Phi]], {x, -\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {y, -\[Pi], \[Pi]},
  Boxed -> False, Axes -> False, Mesh -> False,
  ColorFunction -> ColorData[“CoffeeTones”],
  Background -> Darker[Brown],
  PlotRange -> {{-\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {-\[Pi], \[Pi]}, {-\[Pi], \[Pi]}},
  ViewPoint -> {0, 0, 1}], {\[Phi], 0, 6 \[Pi], \[Pi]/8}]

Here’s a relaxing Sin(xy) curve!
Easy Mathematica code if anyone’s interested:

Manipulate[ Plot3D[Sin[   x y + \[Phi]], {x, -\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}, {y, -\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2},   Boxed -> False, Axes -> False, Mesh -> False,   ColorFunction -> ColorData[“BeachColors”], Background -> LightBlue,   PlotRange -> {{-\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}, {-\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}}], {\[Phi],   0, 6 \[Pi], \[Pi]/8}]

Here’s a relaxing Sin(xy) curve!

Easy Mathematica code if anyone’s interested:

Manipulate[
 Plot3D[Sin[
   x y + \[Phi]], {x, -\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}, {y, -\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2},
  Boxed -> False, Axes -> False, Mesh -> False,
  ColorFunction -> ColorData[“BeachColors”], Background -> LightBlue,
  PlotRange -> {{-\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}, {-\[Pi]/2, \[Pi]/2}}], {\[Phi],
  0, 6 \[Pi], \[Pi]/8}]

  • February 2, 2014
  • 8:16 pm

Anonymous said: Really enjoying all the knowledge on here!!

Thank you!!

  • February 2, 2014
  • 8:15 pm
  • 4 notes

Giant influx of new followers! Hello!

kinggjayysshit:

penis-hunger-games:

letssaynotonormal:

plot-twist-im-gay:

superwholock-slytherinmerlin:

theroguefeminist:

3brokenstrings:

aunteeblazer:

omg

I just saved an entire week worth of science class.thank you tumblr

cool

spiders are not insects though

The more you know

I can not believe people still think spiders are insects. I assumed it was common knowledge that they’re arachnids!

Okay but the fact that ACTUAL insects would be huge IS STILL A PROBLEM guys

FUCK SPIDERS IDC WHAT THEY ARE!

(Source: iraffiruse, via zeroyalviking)

sagansense:

In celebration of Juno’s flyby that’s happening tomorrow, I present to you my top 9 pictures of my all-time favourite planet, the ever stunning, Jupiter!

Source (x)

via burdreams

(via scientific-delirium-madness)

kenobi-wan-obi:

100 Billion Exoplanets Live in Our Milky Way Galaxy

At first blush, there is nothing particularly special about Kepler-32, a dwarf star located about 910 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus.

Image: Milky Way Shows 84 Million Stars in 9 Billion Pixels

In fact, the star, which has five planets in tow, is so common, astronomers at the California Institute of Technology say it’s representative of three-quarters of all the stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

The scientists analyzed Kepler-32′s structure, compared it with other planetary systems discovered by NASA’s Kepler space telescope and sat down to do some math. The result: an estimate that the Milky Way is home to at least 100 billion planets.

“It’s a staggering number, if you think about it,” Caltech astronomer Jonathan Swift, said in a news release on the research.

“Basically there’s one of these planets per star,” he said.

“It’s like unlocking a language — the language of planet formation,” added John Johnson, an assistant professor of astronomy at Caltech.

Interestingly, another team of astronomers last January came up with the same estimate using a different database and different technique. What spurred that team’s work was an original estimate by Kepler scientists in 2010 that the Milky Way had at least 50 billion planets.

The new research is being published in the Astrophysical Journal and online.

(Source: afro-dominicano, via scinerds)

  • October 11, 2013
  • 6:53 am
  • 2 notes

tracingdust said: Found you by Tumblr radar. Wonderful blog. I got carried away on here.

Thank you! I had such a fangirl moment when Tumblr told me I was on the radar hahah